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Replies: 2 - Pages: [1] - Last reply: 2021-07-14 18:46:59 - By: Roberta Elman
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trudy sanders
(Member)

Posts: 4
Registered:
2021-04-26 00:03:56

I need a very extensive explination of Global Aphasia. My mom had stroke 3 yrs ago and I was told by Dr and Therapists it was the worst case they had every seen. It didnt just get her comunication, he got her ability to do anything for herself. she cant brush her her, her teeth, she cant operate a tv remote, she CAN answer a phone and hang it up, she has one main word, back, a few others, no, yes, maybe, i dont know. but its a crap shoot with her if she is answering your correctly. if she is asked if she is in pain, she will sit and cry and show clear signs of pain but say “no”. i need a detailed explination that with the severity of her aphasia that the care takers at nursing home, nurses, techs, dr, everyone, needs to learn to listen to the people that have sat by her side the last 3 yrs and learned her like a book. therapy did not help. nothing helped. she is helpless and needs ppl to understand that there are times that when she answers she could be right, but there are just as many times that when she answers, she has no idea that she naswered wrong or what was even asked of her. HELP!

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Roberta Elman
(Member)

Posts: 49
Registered:
2021-04-26 00:03:56

Dear Trudy,

As you know first hand, global aphasia can be a very confusing and frustrating disorder, both for the person living with it, as well as family members and friends. Global aphasia is diagnosed when receptive skills (understanding language) and expressive skills (speaking) are both severely impaired. As you’ve described, this means that it is very difficult for your mother to say what she wants to, or to understand fully what others are saying to her.

It might make it easier for others to think of Global aphasia as creating a language barrier, similar to what happens when two people can’t communicate well because they speak different languages. If one person is speaking English, but the other person only knows Japanese, it becomes almost impossible to communicate using language or words. In this situation, communication is much more likely to be successful when using non-language ways of communicating, by using pictures, gestures, drawing, etc. Many of these techniques/strategies are the ones we use when we travel overseas or when we communicate with someone who speaks a different language than we do.

In addition, it sounds as though your mother may have great difficulty with yes vs. no responses. This can be common with severe aphasia. An experienced speech-language pathologist may be able to find a way for her to answer questions more reliably without her using spoken words. Sometimes, pointing to a word or symbol, or using a hand gesture, or another technique, may work better. Often, people with severe aphasia, may need instruction and practice to become more accurate at using these techniques.

I’m sorry to hear that speech therapy wasn’t helpful. However, sometimes a different therapist, who has extensive experience working with people with severe aphasia, may be able to teach you, other family members, and her caretakers, some communication strategies that are more effective. You might want to check with the community group list at the National Aphasia Association website to see if there is a group in your area. That way, you could find out from local family members and therapists, which professionals are considered to be the best in your area.

I would also encourage you to see if there is a way for your mother to attend an aphasia group in your community. Groups would provide a wonderful way for her to meet other people who are living with aphasia. It is also important that she feels she is still being treated as an intelligent human being, which she is. Aphasia groups can go a long way toward helping people learn to live successfully with aphasia. And I hope that there will also be an aphasia caregiver group in your community. You also need the education and support that a caregiver group can provide.

Best,

Roberta Elman

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