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PPA vs Broca's
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Replies: 3 - Pages: [1] - Last reply: 2021-06-25 21:01:16 - By: Theresa
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Theresa
(Member)

Posts: 2
Registered:
2021-04-26 00:03:56

A neuropsychologist very quickly jumped to a diagnosis of early-stage PPA after speaking with my 75 yr old mother for a only a few moments and learning that her MRI showed some left cerebral-frontal atrophy. Two neurologists have not even given us a diagnosis but sent us to this psychologist & for speech therapy once a week.

I’m worried that there might be a misdiagnosis since PPA was the only disorder mentioned even though I’ve read that it presents mostly in men age 40-65.

Is there any difference between Primary Progressive Aphasia and Broca’s Aphasia?

What should our next step be, please?

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Anne L. Ver Hoef
(Member)

Posts: 50
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2021-04-26 00:03:56

Dear Theresa,

One distinction between PPA and Broca’s aphasia would be that PPA is progressive and we would expect someone with a diagnosis of Broca’s aphasia, at least if a result of a CVA, they would show at least some improvement. You did not mention what your mother’s primary symptoms are - if they are word finding and speech sequencing problems - which might be similar in both cases. The MRI would certainly be important in a diagnosis, but so would complete neuropsychological and speech-language evaluations. If the neurologists referred you to these two specialists, they should be doing full evaluations and all the information put together for a diagnosis and treatment plan. You could also see how your mother responds to speech-language therapy as this would provide further useful information in diagnostic and treatment planning. Hopefully you will find professionals who can coordinate with your mother and you to best help her be as functional in her communication as possible. Good luck. Anne

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Theresa
(Member)

Posts: 2
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2021-04-26 00:03:56

Thank you so much for your reply. The speech problem is shortened sentences & usually she can’t find the correct word for what she wants to say. Otherwise it all makes sense. I’m not confident in the short evaluation she was given by a psychologist at the speech therapy office. It just seems to me that the diagnosis of progressive aphasia dementia was arrived at extremely quickly, based on MRI changes in the left cerebral, but with little neuropyschological testing. I will be following up and will let you know how it turns out.

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