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User profile for Margaret Forbes
Name: Margaret Forbes
Alias: Margaret Forbes
Forum Status: Member
Posts:30
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Re: Aphasia group & therapy - Milwaukee area
Posted at: 2021-11-24 14:52:55
I don’t personally know about aphasia therapy in Milwaukee, but I suggest you contact the Milwaukee Speech and Language Clinic at the University of Wisconsin-
414-229-4351. They should be able to guide you to some resources for aphasia group and individual therapy.

Margaret Forbes

Re: Do I Have Aphasia
Posted at: 2021-11-24 14:36:57
>Hello, My name is Claudia and I am 32 years old.
>On August 14 2009 I was diagnosed with a partial
>seizure disorder. The siezure causes me to lose
>the ability to speak. I can communicate
>otherwise writing, pointing ECT. They don’t
>know why I get these seizures as I only started
>having them in August. I have not had any head
>injury and they did all the necessary head scans
>and I do not have any tumors or blood clots.
>Could my seizures be an Aphasia. please let me
>e know. Thank you.

Dear Claudia,
Seizures can cause disruptions in the ability to speak. Without seeing you, I cannot give an opinion about whether or not you have aphasia.

It is most important that you have expert medical assistance in trying to figure out what is causing your seizures. I would strongly recommend that you see a neurologist who knows about seizures if you have not already done so. I also suggest that you see a Speech-Language Pathologist, who can assess your speech and language, and give you guidance in how to manage your communication problem.

Best of luck to you,
Margaret Forbes

Re: Do I Have Aphasia
Posted at: 2021-11-24 14:36:27
>Hello, My name is Claudia and I am 32 years old.
>On August 14 2009 I was diagnosed with a partial
>seizure disorder. The siezure causes me to lose
>the ability to speak. I can communicate
>otherwise writing, pointing ECT. They don’t
>know why I get these seizures as I only started
>having them in August. I have not had any head
>injury and they did all the necessary head scans
>and I do not have any tumors or blood clots.
>Could my seizures be an Aphasia. please let me
>e know. Thank you.

Dear Claudia,
Seizures can cause disruptions in the ability to speak. Without seeing you, I cannot give an opinion about whether or not you have aphasia.

It is most important that you have expert medical assistance in trying to figure out what is causing your seizures. I would strongly recommend that you see a neurologist who knows about seizures if you have not already done so. I also suggest that you see a Speech-Language Pathologist, who can assess your speech and language, and give you guidance in how to manage your communication problem.

Best of luck to you,
Margaret Forbes

Re: help
Posted at: 2021-11-09 13:24:31
>my father is inable to talk understandably also
>right side of his body damaged and in ethiopia
>the doctor said there is no tretment for his
>problem so what can i do to help him?

Can you tell me a little more about when your father became ill and what kind of treatment he has received so far? Is there any medical care available to him?

About his communication: does he seem to understand you? Can he answer yes/no questions correctly? I would like to understand his condition and what has been done so far.

Margaret

Re: functional recovery after injury in gender
Posted at: 2021-11-03 12:30:15
>hello:
Is the brain functional recovery better
>in women than men after aphasia and why?
thank
>you
While there are a few studies that indicate this, there are a bunch more that don’t, so my best answer to your question is maybe. In any case, I think factors other than gender (e.g. severity of aphasia, other health factors, etc) are significantly more important in recovery.
Margaret

Re: new-cipro induced aphasia -questions
Posted at: 2021-11-02 13:02:37
It sounds to me as if you need to consult a neurologist about possible causes of your aphasia. While I have heard of occasional cases of confusion with Cipro, I am not aware of Cipro-induced aphasia. While it certainly may occur, you may also be experiencing aphasia for another reason, which a neurologist may be able to identify.

Margaret Forbes

Re: hypnosis
Posted at: 2021-12-04 10:44:24
I am far from an expert on hypnosis, but my understanding is that it can be instrumental in focusing attention. To the extent that it does that, it might well help some aphasic patients focus on using their language abilities better. I do not know of any literature to support its use, however.

Margaret Forbes

Re: Mom’s aphasia getting worse
Posted at: 2021-11-15 22:21:03
Dear Sue,
If you are located near Chicago, Northwestern University has a program specializing in Primary Progressive Aphasia which offers help to patients and their families. Here is the link:
[email protected]
Even if you are not near Chicago this program can direct you to a lot of useful information.
An experienced speech-language pathologist near where you and your mother live could evaluate your mother and make suggestions about ways that she might communicate.
Unforunately, Progressive Aphasia does tend to lead to a decline in language ability, but you and your mother could well be helped by professional advice.
Please write again if I can provide further information.

Margaret Forbes

Re: Post stroke aphasia - Russian speaking woman
Posted at: 2021-12-30 12:48:21
Where are you located? I can try to find a Russian-speaking speech-language pathologist if I know where you are.
Margaret Forbes
Re: Wernike’s Aphasia
Posted at: 2021-12-19 11:18:42
>My father had a stoke two months ago and suffers
>from a severe Wernike’s aphasia. He has just
>returned home from rehab and we are having a
>great deal of difficulty caring for him. He
>understands very little to almost nothing of what
>we say to him and he fails to realize that we
>don’t understand him. He is unable to read and
>cannot watch television because he doesn’t
>understand it. He also becomes extremely
>frustrated, angry and agitated. He does not sleep
>well at night and is constanly getting uo and
>disturbing my mother. He also perseverates on
>certain topics concerning his health and we are
>unable to understand him or explain about his
>medical needs. We are consulting a psychiatrist
>to help stabilize his emotions . Can we expect
>any improvement in this situation? Will his
>comprehension return? Is there an alternative way
>we can communicate with him?

This can be an extremely difficult and frustrating situation. It is really not primarily a psychiatric condition, having been caused by his stroke, but it may be that a psychiatrist could help both you and him cope with the frustration. I think you would be more likely to receive specific ideas, and more importantly, direct help, from a speech-language pathologist who has experience treating Wernicke’s aphasia. I advise you to consult one. In general with a Wernicke’s patient (and I can be only general,since I have not met your father), it can help to speak at a slower than normal rate in simple, short sentences. This can help because Wernicke’s patients have trouble processing the meaning of words and sentences. Sometimes it also helps to use pictures-they can be of family members, objects that the patient needs daily but cannot name, and feelings that the patient cannot express verbally. An experienced speech-language pathologist can help you discover which ways might help you communicate better with your father, and thus reduce everyone’s frustration. Skill and experience are very helpful in discovering possible channels of communication for Wernicke’s patients, so again I urge you to consult a speech-language pathologist.

Feel free to write again if you have more questions.

Margaret Forbes

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