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Name: Nan
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Re: Father recently diagnosed
Posted at: 2021-03-29 12:50:54
I would suggest you search for a speech language pathologist familiar with neurogenic problems in adult populations.
There are two national organizations that will provide lists of speech-language pathologists in your area or across the country if you wish. American Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA) and you can search their web ASHA.org and the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences (ANCDS). http://.ancds. org. There are numberous organizations such as the Alzheimers Association and National Aphasia Association you may want to check with also.

Gessing from your e-mail the language (speaking, reading, listening to instructions and writing) problems appeared first with continued decline in memory problems. Progressive aphasia refers to a progressive decline. When someone you love starts to decline in communication skills it can be very frustrating and a spouse may often lose their key communication partner.

If it is a progressive aphasia or dementia the individual will not return to normal - so rehabilitation is focused more on compensation.In other words, searching for a compensatory strategy for interacting or reminding the individual. In the end stage, family members or staff at a care facility will need to anticipate the persons needs and not rely on the person to ask or request.

You should not expect the person to learn new information or remember things when you tell them. Practicing or drills don’t help. Visual cues like pointing to the object are sometimes helpful.

Some suggestions regarding communication cues and devices - you can us small simple scrap books (found in any general store, craft store or photo shops) and place pictures of people or objects in the scrapbook. Keep the pictures simple and do not put too many pictures or words on one page. There are many companies that have pre-printed photos or drawings that you can purchase but we often use photographs and cut out pictures from magazines. The other thing we have recommended from time to time are “talking photo” albums. You are able to place about 20 pictures and record short messages. You could also place pictures around the room or house (example: picture of a bed on the door of the bedroom). There are many high tech devices usually called augmentative or alternative devices that may be purchased - but, I would recommend you check with a professional (speech language pathologist or possibly an occupational therapist). The devices may be very expensive from ,000 - ,000 and often someone with a dementia cannot learn to operate a new piece of equipment.

Thanks for writing and let us know if you have additional questions.

Re: aphasia during pregnancy
Posted at: 2022-03-20 08:18:15
Thanks for contacting us.
Of course, we are both guessing a bit here from limited information - but, here is what the physician may have been referring to:

transient ischemic attack (TIA) - is often referred to as a “small” stroke. Very often symptoms such as aphasia, facial weakness or droop, visual changes, or problems with moving a hand or leg may occur and resolve very relatively quickly or within a 24 hr. period. A TIA is not specific to pregnancy and may be seen in any age range and male or female. Risk factors for stroke may include high blood pressure, diabetes, high cholesterol, obesity, and smoking to name a few.

Hope this helps - please feel free to contact with additional questions.

Re: aphasia in children
Posted at: 2022-03-14 08:41:33
Thanks to ASHA and Janet Whitney -
Here is another resource for you.

Royal College of Physicians, http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/index.asp
Stroke in Childhood
Stroke in Childhood Clinical guidelines
Stroke in Childhood Patient and Carer booklet
Comments on these guidelines should be sent to:
Alex Hoffman , Stroke Programme Manager,
Clinical Effectiveness and Evaluation Unit
The Royal College of Physicians,
11 St Andrews Place,
Regent’s Park,
London NW1 4LE
Tel: 020 7935 1174 ext 335
Fax 020 7487 3988
e-mail [email protected].

My personal opinion - there would need to be a clear injury to the brain identified (example: an infarct noted on MRI or CT) and a likely etiology (example: cardiac problem). I would suspect some variation in the literature as it may not be frequently reported and I would suspect unless there is clear unilateral weakness, language problems would not be noticed or reported until the interval where normal comprehension tasks and/or vocal/ verbal language skills would occur. Clnicians can try to gain information regarding potential injury through careful interview with the mother/family.

You may also want to check childhood apraxia literature. That literature may have additional trends in onset.

Hope this helps in your search!

Re: Aphasia and children
Posted at: 2022-03-12 16:12:22
Let me suggest a couple of resources for you to try:

ANCDS Office
(Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences)
[email protected]

This is a group of professionals and many are board certified in neurologic communication disorders. You will want to ask for assistance in contacting individuals with board certification in pediatrics.

A second resource would be the
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
ASHA.org
This is the national organization for audiologists and speech-language pathologists. The maintain a list of individual members and those that are certified by work location. They also have specific special interest groups that focus on neurogenic language disorders (Special Interest Division #2).

I am sure both of these organizations will help get you started and I will search for additional resources.

Re: aphasia in children
Posted at: 2022-03-12 16:11:18
Let me suggest a couple of resources for you to try:

ANCDS Office
(Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences)
[email protected]

This is a group of professionals and many are board certified in neurologic communication disorders. You will want to ask for assistance in contacting individuals with board certification in pediatrics.

A second resource would be the
American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
ASHA.org
This is the national organization for audiologists and speech-language pathologists. The maintain a list of individual members and those that are certified by work location. They also have specific special interest groups that focus on neurogenic language disorders (Special Interest Division #2).

I am sure both of these organizations will help get you started and I will search for additional resources.

Re: Aphasia and children
Posted at: 2022-03-12 08:26:25
Same question posted on Professional questions. Will search for aphasia research with children and reply as soon as possible.
Re: Anyone with TBI?
Posted at: 2022-03-12 08:06:31
Yes - communication may return after TBI.
Aphasia is a language problem (understanding spoken words, reading, speaking and writing) and very often the brain damage is located in a specific spot of the brain (often left hemisphere). Sounds as if your son experienced diffuse brain damage (the fall may have caused the brain to hit or bounce against the skull). As a result individuals with TBI may have different symptoms than aphasia - typically referred to as cognitive skills for example: problems with short term memory, sequencing, impulsive, or concentration. And the person may experience additional motor problems with speech (difficulty sequencing sounds). Most clinicians will not promise a complete recovery to normal - and long term rehabilitation will be recommended. Let us know if you have additional questions.
Re: mom’s speech-again
Posted at: 2022-01-22 16:49:43
There are many things to consider:
- A club or Senior Citizens group that she could go to a couple of days a week
-Some churches or community centers have day programs for adults during the week
- A friend or neighbor that could be near by to check on her
- Check with your local phone system to see if there are phones for the “speech impaired” and see if there are phones with memory or automatic dials in the event of an emergency
- Sometimes you can find a sitter to be in the house and do minimal chores for low wages

It is wonderful to hear she has some activities she enjoys doing!

Feel free to ask more questions. You may also want to post this on the Caregiver portions of this forum - I am sure there are many good suggestions out there.

Re: Temporary Aphasia
Posted at: 2022-01-18 12:35:02
Seizures could be a reason for changes observed cognitive and communication status. Communication problems may be transient - but not usually described or diagnosed as an “aphasia”. What you are describing may be a seizure disorder or epilepsy. Loss of consciousness may occur in epilepsy. And some seizures may be generalized (begin deep in the brain) and impair consciousness.
Etiology is often unknown or may be associated with a previous head trauma, infection, vascular problems, intoxications, or chemical imbalances. In some cases, seizures may be associated with brain tumor but based on your e-mail sounds as if he has had neurological work-up to rule out a tumor (usually some type of x-ray to take pictures of the brain). There are epilepsy centers and seizure specialists your neurologists may be able to recommend.

Astrocyte is a large “star shaped” cell with branches and found in the nervous. system/tissue. Astroblastoma or astrocytoma refer to a tumor (neoplasm) but as noted above - prior neurological work up sounds negative for a tumor.

Thanks for your comments and questions.

Re: Need referrals
Posted at: 2022-02-03 06:38:38
I would recommend you look for a Speech-Language Pathologist. You will want to ask the clinician about their experiences working with individuals experiencing aphasia and ask about their the certification. For example the American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA) provides national certification and the Academy of Neurologic Communication Disorders and Sciences (ANCDS) provides special certification in neurological communication disorders.

To find a clinician in your area you could ask your physician for a referral, check with your local hospital or look in the yellow-pages. There are also national organizations (ASHA and ANCDS are two) that can give you a list of clinicians in your region or state. Often universities have speech-language pathology or communication disorders clinics with individual and group treatment programs in aphasia. In addition utilizing the Aphasia Hope Foundation, you may want to look for aphasia or stroke support groups that are often listed in events sections of your local newspaper. These groups often will have contacts with speech-language pathologists in your area. There are additional organizations and web sites listed above (click on the Resources button) or if you are interested in sites that offer opportunities in aphasia research click on the Research button.

If you need additional assistance please let us know. Thank you for asking your question.

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