Aphasia Hope Foundation » Forums
You are not logged in.
Posting in this forum require registration.
2031 Registered users.
User profile for Bill Connors
Name: Bill Connors
Alias: Bill Connors
Forum Status: Member
Posts:4
Web site:
Gravatar:
AIM:
Jabber / Google Talk:
Yahoo IM:
Description:
Recent posts:
Re: Repetition / Perseveration
Posted at: 2021-11-30 13:49:43
Hi. We have found that it is very important in effective aphasia therapyto do activites that do not overuse imitation, repetition or dependance on outside cuing as this seems to reinforce the imitative neural pathways in the brain and perhaps encouraging perseveration. We, whenever possible, use activites in which the patient is working form his/her own memory or idea. for example, we rarely use ’say this after me’ drill or picture stimuli. We also work usually at the sentence level. There are innovative activites and treatment protocols that address this.

Bill Connors
The Aphasia Center of Innovative Treatment
The Online Aphasia Treatment Program
http://www.aphasiatoolbox.com
[email protected]
724.494.2534

Re: global aphasia
Posted at: 2021-11-30 13:42:58
I am so sorry to hear about your dad’s long bout with aphasia. While 9 years is a long time and recovery is easier said than done as I mentioned in another response. Actually my advice is quite similar to that response. I definitely have seen patients improve after long periods of time but this requires an excellent treatment program that uses a clear picture of his communication impairment to build a program exclusively for him. The fact is that aphasia is different for everyone. An important key to re-motivating him is to find ways for his to communicate even with small gains that he sees as significant. While this seems obvious and perhaps impossible to attain, it has been done. Often, the beginnings involve pragmatics [ PACE therapy ] which is very different from traditional didactic aphasia therapy. It focuses on taking turns, exchanging new information, using various modalities [ gestures, writing, drawing, etc ] . A key is to find in effective perhaps creative ways a modality of communication that allows for his attention as well as clarification, expansion and/or verification. Always, we persist also on attempts to establish speech output. Often in cases such as you describe, apraxia of speech and/or oral movements needs to be addressed. I have found that way too often apraxia has not been addressed effectively. I would be pleased to discuss this further with you if you would like. In any case, I wish you the best of luck.
Re: 7 years of aphasia
Posted at: 2021-11-30 13:36:09
I am so sorry to hear about your mother’s protracted aphasia. While 7 years is a long time and recovery is easier said than done, I definitely have seen patients improve after long periods of time. This requires an excellent treatment program that uses a clear picture of her communication impairment to build a program exclusively for her. The fact is that aphasia is different for everyone. The key to reducing her anger and frustration is to find ways for her to communicate even with small gains that she sees as significant. You all certainly have reasons to be frustrated. While this seems obvious and perhaps impossible to attain, it has been done. Often, the beginnings involve pragmatics [ PACE therapy ] which is very different from traditional didactic aphasia therapy. It focuses on taking turns, exchanging new information, using various modalities [ gestures, writing, drawing, etc ] . A key is to find in effective perhaps creative ways a modality of communication that allows for her attention as well as clarification, expansion and/or verification. Always, we persist also on attempts to establish speech output. Often in cases such as you describe, apraxia of speech and/or oral movements needs to be addressed. I have found that way too often apraxia has not been addressed effectively. I would be pleased to discuss this further with you if you would like. In any case, I wish you the best of luck.
Re: my husband
Posted at: 2021-11-30 13:23:46
So sorry to hear about your husband’s stroke. It sounds as if his communication skills are slowly beginning to recover. As Magie commented it is not possible to diagnosis these problems given you informatin, however, I do have a few observations. His difficulty in expressing himself and his inconsistent responses make if impossible to know exactly how much he understands. Apraxia and difficulty with use of symbols [ asymbolia ] may also play negative roles in this. It is good that he knows what to do with items [ loss of the ability to recognize objects is agnosia ]. His receptive skills will hopefully continue to improve. We find it important to avoid therapy tasks and drills that use or depend too much on imitation or closure tasks as we believe that these strengthen the neural pathways in the brain for imitation and not propositional, normal speech pathways and thereby inadvertently encourage perseveration [ repetition of the same words or sounds] or jargon mumbling [ which is what it sounds like you husband is exhibiting] . From your description of his speech output, he may have impairments in the area of phonological aphasia which is the sound selection part of speech production. This can be a difficult type of aphasia to treat but we have had success. Often for example patients with these types of problems lose their knowledge of syllable structure so working on speech sound in gradually increasing syllable stimuli helps.

Bill Connors
The Aphasia Center of Innovative Treatment
The Online Aphasia Treatment Program
http://www.aphasiatoolbox.com
[email protected]
724.494.2534

Search for all user posts